Are You Sacrificing Virgins in Your SAP Integration?

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedintumblr
Sacrificing Virgins

Sacrificing Virgins

I know the question posited in the title of this post might come off as odd at first sight. Let me start here: at a seminar I once attended, participants started talking about the Mayas. Specifically, about how Mayas used to sacrifice virgins. Apparently, they did it when they wanted something badly, e.g. good weather, avoiding the wrath of the gods. The best they had to offer were their virgins, as they were regarded as the most valuable members of society. Let’s say it worked one time. Obviously, they wanted more good fortune, which came at the cost of yet another life. In the long run, this meant that the Mayas contributed to the extinction of their own people. But how does this connect to integration scenarios?

Just this week I have collaborated with a customer. I had to configure some FTPS channels, and we ended up debating whether this should be done per connection or constantly. He recommended using what worked before in the same context. Today I realized that maybe that was only justifiable at some point in time. I’ve experienced it myself when dealing with one of the first AX adapters, trying to figure out how it worked. We reached a challenging point; something didn’t work when using the gateway of the PO system, so we changed it, in order to use the gateway of the SAP system. That worked out great, it performed as expected. But how many times do we actually know if the problem is solved for the specific scenario we are dealing with?

This is what I mean when I talk about sacrificing virgins: we believe something is true, or that something will provide a solution to our issues, but sometimes that thing doesn’t generate the expected result. However, we do it time and again. This happens in a lot of places, and in various areas of life. We believe something is true, but sometimes it can backfire. This can also happen when we design things: we believe something will work (because it did before), and we don’t want to invest more time into something that may be smarter, even though it might help us more in the future.

This is just some food for thought. If you want to read more, check out picourse.com or figaf.com, where you can also learn more about some of my products and tools.

Also, feel free to share the number of virgins you have sacrificed by choosing an old method instead of looking for smarter solutions at one point in time. I’ll be expecting your thoughts in the comments!

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedintumblr

Comments are closed.